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The Wheel of the Year: The eight Sabbats

As the wheel of the year turns, pagans around the world celebrate the eight sabbats, marking the changing seasons and the natural rhythms of the earth. These sabbats are a key part of pagan traditions and are observed with rituals, feasts, and gatherings.



The first of the sabbats is Imbolc, celebrated on February 1st, marking the beginning of spring. This sabbat is associated with the goddess Brigid and is a time for new beginnings, creativity, and purification.


Next comes Ostara, held around March 21st, which celebrates the spring equinox. This sabbat is a time for honoring the balance between light and dark, as well as the return of fertility and growth to the land.


Beltane follows on May 1st, marking the height of spring and the beginning of summer. This sabbat is a celebration of fertility, passion, and the abundance of the earth. It is a time for dancing around the maypole and lighting bonfires.


Litha, also known as Midsummer, takes place around June 21st, marking the summer solstice. This sabbat celebrates the longest day of the year and is a time for honoring the sun, as well as the bountiful harvest that is to come.


Lammas, held on August 1st, is the first of the three harvest festivals. This sabbat is a time for giving thanks for the first fruits of the harvest and for the abundance of the earth.


Mabon, celebrated around September 21st, marks the autumn equinox. This sabbat is a time for honoring the balance between light and dark once again, as well as giving thanks for the fruits of the harvest.


Samhain, held on October 31st, is perhaps the most well-known of the sabbats, as it is the pagan festival that has evolved into the modern-day Halloween. This sabbat marks the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter. It is a time for honoring the ancestors and the cycle of life, death, and rebirth.


Finally, Yule takes place around December 21st, marking the winter solstice. This sabbat celebrates the rebirth of the sun and the eventual return of spring. It is a time for gathering with loved ones, feasting, and exchanging gifts.


Each of the sabbats holds its own significance and traditions, but all are connected by the overarching theme of honoring the cycles of nature and the changing seasons. For pagans, the sabbats are a time for connecting with the earth, celebrating the beauty of the natural world, and honoring ancient traditions that have been passed down through generations.

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3 Comments


The wheel of pagan was very interesting. I had no clue there was one.

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Thank you so much for all this information. I am learning a lot.


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Love this wheel! Especially with the full moon names. Thank you so much for sharing.

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